Wednesday, 15 July 2015

Rescuing the Bees ... and Others


I seem to be spending a lot of time recently rescuing little critters.

This little bee was sat on the floor of the polytunnel with no energy so I nipped back to the house and made up a sugar solution, just lots of sugar and a little bit of water.  I put some on the edge of one of my little tools and left him to it.  Immediately he began to feed and soon perked up.

Within five minutes he was gone,


I left the rest of the solution in the polytunnel for next time.

I've been doing the same in the house with bees that get trapped overnight and are losing energy.  Every time I go into the paddock with the dogs I check the sheep's' water  buckets for struggling flies or other insects, and rescue them with a leaf if I am in time.

Buckets that I leave about the place with water that I might need I make sure to leave a stick or piece of wood in as a ramp to help anything that falls in climb out again, and I make sure there is some but not lots of water in the bird baths for the little creatures that use them

I'm sure Lovely Hubby thinks I've gone a bit soft but he grins and lets me get on with it.  

And yes, I have also rescued some more baby rabbits that Ginger brought home and set them free back in the woods,  I do ask them as I carry them to safety NOT to eat my veggies .... but I don't think they speak English!!

Sue xx

22 comments:

  1. Hi Sue, well done for feeding your 'rescuees' - but just a quick reminder, don't retain your mixed up sugar syrup for more than 4 or 5 days or it will begin to ferment and then it wouldn't be good for the bees...And your bee was more than likely a 'she' rather than a 'he' - males may drink nectar from flowers for their own tummies, but they don't forage and there are far fewer of them flying about. Up the workers, ladies!!! x

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    1. Thanks for the heads up, I will pour the solution away on the grass each time after a couple of days, something may like to snack on it.

      I call all the wildlife 'he' especially the insects, just a habit.

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  2. How sweet Sue, that's very kind. We do need to look after our bees as much as possible, they're very helpful to me in the veg garden.

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  3. I just found you through Senior Adventures and was taken by the similarities between us... I'm old enough to be your mama but still life has it's parallels. I, too, married a sailor and then when he retired he moved us out to the country and we set about playing at farming. I am anxious to read more about you and hope you will check out my blog as well. Cheers!

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  4. You are much braver than me. I don't like creepy crawlies although I wouldn't kill anything.

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  5. We always rescue bees too, the top comment is an interesting one though. I hadn't considered that x

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  6. You'll get your reward in your next life

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  7. Just yesterday afteroon, I rescued 3 big bumblebees, a young goldfinch and a young (very confused) wood pigeon from our greenhouse! The woodpigeons live in the woods at the end of the paddock, and this is their second baby this year, the first one was taken by the sparrowhawks which are also a breeding pair in the woods.
    The bees were easy, trap them in an old plastic tumbler, pop a bit of card over the top and shake the tumbler outside the door until they have the sense to fly off.
    The goldfinch was easy too, our goldfinches don't leave in winter, they stay in the woods and get well fed all year, so they have no fear of us. In fact they even sit on one feeder whilst I fill the other one! I did wear gloves to get hold of him though, don't want mum and dad to smell 'human' on him!
    The pigeon, well, we all know they can be a bit dim, but honestly, this one is positively thick! I got a towel over his head, picked him up, put him out on the lawn, took the towel off, and.....he flew straight back into the greenhouse! So, all through the palaver with the towel again, but this time before he was released the greenhouse door was firmly closed! We have automatic openers fitted to the windows, so I did worry a bit that he was going to attempt yet another break-in, but he flew off to join mum and dad in the paddock!
    I'm afraid that I tend not to help flies, I loathe them!

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    1. Two years ago, our up and over garage door fell off and had to be replaced. The new door would take a week or two to arrive, so in the meantime, the repair chap secured the old door in place. There was a gap of a few inches at the top. When the new door arrived, just as it had been fitted, the man told me that there was a bird's nest with babies in the garage (the adults had obviously been getting through the gap). Because of the terrible weather we get up here, and the fact that the boiler and other valuable items were in the garage, it wasn't possible to leave the garage door open all the time. The RSPB said just to leave the garage window open and the adult birds would find their way in and out to feed the babies. Mrs Blackbird got the hang of it very quickly. Mr Blackbird wasn't so bright, flew in through the cloakroom window, round and round the sitting room, dropping worms and lots of poo as he went, two crazy dogs in mad pursuit, before the bird landed on the floor and I caught him. Took me hours to clean up the mess, especially as he'd pooped all down my new vertical blinds!!

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    2. Mary in Perth Australia17 July 2015 at 01:44

      What a gorgeous story Susan. Wonderful description of Mr Blackbird and his antics :)

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  8. I rescue tired bees and worms that have ended up away from the soil. Flies are trapped and let out of the door and upside down ladybirds are turned the right way up. Soft?! Yes. We even have a pet seagull which comes for its breakfast, dinner and tea.
    xx

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  9. I've never heard of rescuing bees, Sue....only you would think of doing this!

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  10. Jess is our head bee rescuer with little spoons of sugared water. I'm always rescuing them from the sun room trying to place a bowl gently over them then sliding a card underneath. I love watching them fly off x

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  11. I only found out last year that's what to do with a drowsy bee so it was interesting to read this and good to share with others x

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  12. Mary in Perth Australia16 July 2015 at 08:29

    Another one here who rescues the little lost souls :) It seems like such a small thing to do to make a difference.

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    1. My husband calls me Gerald Durrell!

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  13. During a recent rainy spell, there were no bees to be seen and I wondered how they were faring. So I made up a sugar solution and poured it on to a folded piece of kitchen roll, placing it amongst my blue geraniums but sheltered from the rain. They came! And I replenished it every other day until the rain went away and the bees could work once more in the garden. I love bees.

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  14. I never thought of that but I often do the rescue of worms, flies, bees and anything else living. My mum had a fly once that seemed to stay in the house for ages, she called him Simon! (I come from a weird family!)

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    1. Mary in Perth Australia17 July 2015 at 01:41

      We are an odd lot too. All spiders are called Fred (and some Freds are rather big out here.....lol)

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  15. This did make me chuckle, you are a soft and sensitive soul :) I think it's quite nice though.
    Love Gem x x
    Gem'sCountryLifeDream

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  16. Wow...Would you consider keeping bees on your land? Bee colonies are dying all over the planet, and we won't survive without them. Good job saving the ones you find.

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    1. We've already got this planned. Lovely Hubby has done a course and been in touch with the local bee keeping association. And just up the road from us is the National Bee Centre for Wales at Bodnant Farm.

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