Thursday, 23 April 2015

In the Polytunnel



This was the state of play last week before we left for our weekend break.

I love, love, love Courgette, Cucumber and Squash seedlings, there's something so satisfyingly chunky about those strong leaves bursting through the compost and standing to attention.  I apologised profusely to the ones I had planted upside down that had to twist themselves into position to get their leaves above their roots, I was obviously daydreaming when I popped some of them into the pots,  I have replanted them the right way round now ... much to their delight.


The peas are doing really well too, this was last week.


Our tea on Tuesday included to Pea Shoot toppings just so we can say we have at last easten some homegrown food :-)


All the seedlings have come on so much more than they are seen here, but unfortunately the pictures are stuck in the camera which Lovely Hubby has to photograph the ongoing work outside, so I will have to download them later.


Spring Onion and Beetroot from last week.


Radishes, planted directly into the raised bed inside the polytunnel, again they are SO much bigger already.  They are being mollycoddled as I would like a few to eat next week when I do Live Below the Line.  I need to sit and plan what I will be eating and buying before I start, but Radish thinnings and our free range eggs are most definitely on the menu.


I got some more free gifts on my Kitchen Garden magazine subscription this month.  It was like a lovely birthday pressie popping through the letterbox.

I'm off to try and get back my camera now, I've taken so many photos I can't remember what's on there.  

I was asked again recently why I enjoy growing our own food .... I'll point to to THIS post, written three years ago.

Sue xx



9 comments:

  1. We live in Tasmania and moved from a sheltered site to an empty paddock surrounded by empty paddocks. I wanted to put in two poly tunnels but after living here I wasn't sure. We don't have wind all the time, but when we do it can be quite fierce. After seeing your lovely ones I am thinking it may be done. Would you be so kind one day when you are not busy, to email me the details of what your husband used to erect yours.
    Kind Regards
    Kellie Steele
    jamesnkel@hotmail.com

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  2. that magazine subscription is paying for itself time and time with all those free gifts.

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  3. There's nothing better than home-grown veggies. Love your blog, Sue. Deb (Ontario, Canada)

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  4. Sue, you must be so pleased to have all these little plants coming upl Can't wait to see how they all turn out for the garden.

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  5. We had a little bit of snow here today in my part of Canada. So happy to see all your plants coming up.

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  6. Anyone who has to ask why we grow our own food has never tasted stuff straight from the garden or had the satisfaction of eating a meal that's all home grown. Seems so obvious to me but then we've been growing our own for 30+ years and I forget other people have never had the chance or inclination or are only now starting.
    Your veggies are coming along nicely
    From the 'other' Sue who grows her own!!

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  7. There is nothing better than home grown, taste, we know where it's been and where its come from, I know what you mean about squash seedlings, they are so robust :) I just need th enights to warm up so I can get my veg seedlings planted outside, they are bursting out of the tray to get on with it :)

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  8. I've been planting almost exactly the same selection! I rely heavily on courgettes, squash and beans, I'm hoping mine will start showing over the weekend, I was a bit slower with planting mine! :)

    Katie x

    http://www.long-may-she-rain.blogspot.co.uk/

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  9. You cannot beat homegrown both the pleasure in growing it and the added pleasure of eating it.

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