Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Weeds and Trees

 
We are gradually and steadily digging up the weeds in the front flower bed.  It didn't seem much of a job when we started but the weeds must have been plucked off at ground level for years and never fully uprooted and as we are trying to make a good job of it, we are trying hard to dig out all the well established roots.
 
Trying not to disturb the roots of the shrubs and plants around them slows the job down considerably but we are determined to do it properly.
 
 
It's worth it when we get to a stage where we can give the remaining plants a good water to apologise for disturbing them, and scatter on a layer of bark chippings as mulch  all around to keep the sun from burning their roots.
 
 
And talking of bark chippings ... we are amassing quite a lot of chippings and sawdust as the large old oak tree is finally being 'planked'.  After lying on the hillside in all weathers to let the rain wash the tannins etc out of the wood, it is finally ready to be made into something usable. 
 
Of course all the smaller logs are to be stored for firewood and in a couple of years they will be seasoned nicely and will be used to keep us all cosy in the house, but the main trunk of the tree once the slices have been thoroughly seasoned, which we have been told will take about three years,  one year for each inch of thickness of each slice, are to be turned into furniture, some for us and some of the pieces will be for sale.  It's all part of Lovely Hubby's long term retirement plan. 
 
I find it lovely that part of his retirement plan matches my paternal great grandfathers lifelong business which was making furniture out of oak.  He had a workshop directly above a garage in Hulme, Manchester above a couple of chaps starting their first car business, they were a certain Mr Rolls and Mr Royce.  When he had a large piece of furniture to get out of the workshop he used to lower it down a trapdoor in the floor into their garage and they would help him take it out to the front.

 
 Eventually the site of the old oak tree will be hidden by our garages with solar panels on the roof and LH's workshop at the end.  It was such a shame that we had to chop down this most magnificent of trees in the first place but knowing that every inch of it is being used makes it fit perfectly into our plans, both short and long term.
 
And I think that the number of trees we have planted over the last few weeks slightly makes up for our cutting this one down in what looked like it's finest hour.
 
Sue xx
 
 

16 comments:

  1. I always feel terribly sad when an old tree is felled, but I do understand.
    At least it will be put to good use and will carry on down the ages when made into furniture.

    I live in a period property, the timber frame is oak.....I often look at the huge timbers and wonder about the magnificent trees that were felled to erect this property.

    You most certainly have made up for the loss by all your wonderful plantings........

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  2. Your hard work seems to be paying off, all looks rosy in the garden.

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  3. Your shrub patch looks much nicer and the weeds should be reasonably suppressed by the chippings.

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  4. What a difference you've made to the front bed. Love how you both have a plan on the go x

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  5. What a difference you are making. I'm sure toes shrubs are very appreciative. Not sure if it would be possible, but how about drilling lots of holes in the reaming tree stump to start it off as an insect hotel? A few flowering plants around the base would encourage them to investigate the area and discover the 'vacant rooms' ....

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    1. The remaining stump has been cut off at a specific height so that it will become a large table base. We are topping it with a few pieces of Welsh slate and will put benches and chairs around it so we can enjoy the wonderful view across the valley and watch the sunset.

      So its for us not the insects ..... they have two acres of woodland to set up home in I really don't think we need to build anything specific for them :-)

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    2. Oh that sounds lovely. What a good idea :)

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  6. That front border looks great. I love the idea of making a table out of the base of the tree you've felled. I can imagine sitting there in the sunshine with a lovely cream tea! X

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  7. Recycling again, the best yet!
    Do you know anyone with a Smokery? They might like some of the chipping s to use, maybe barter for some smoked fish/meat/cheeses?
    Looking forward to seeing the table and sitting out area, a bit jealous though, lol!

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    1. Not a bad idea that!! Although we are running a 'closed system', so nothing leaves :-)

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  8. The weeded garden looks great Sue. It always makes a difference. Regards Kathy A, Brisbane, Australia

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  9. It's all taking shape now.
    Jane x

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  10. that sure is a big tree. cant wait to see what you do with the timber!

    Weeds.... seriously why do they grow quicker than normal plants or is that just in my garden???

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    1. Nope ... it happens here too, although some of the 'weeds' have the most beautiful flowers and are being left for a while :-)

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  11. How good is that retirement plan! I liked finding out about your paternal great grandfather's business. My maternal great grandfather made furniture too - chairs to be exact. His claim to fame was that he made chairs for Queen Victoria. I have some that he made : )

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  12. Have some similar weed orientated flower beds myself! Love the story of your Great Grandfather and look forward to seeing what LH makes with your wooden treasure!

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