Monday, 7 April 2014

What a Difference a Day Makes

 
One day of digging holes and planting trees will change the look of this hillside for ever.
 
On Saturday we started with the blank canvas that is this first picture, banged the stakes in where the fruit trees were going to be planted, checked our lines and then just went for it.

 
A few hours later and many buckets of water carried across from the house ...

Suky posing for posterity in front of all our hard work.
 
... and we had eleven trees planted, but there should have been twelve!!
 
We had been short changed on the delivery.  So we downed tools, scraped the mud off our wellies and jumped in the truck.  Luckily they are absolutely brilliant in our local nursery Tal Goed (see the link at the top of the sidebar for their Facebook page) and the owner just waved us in the direction of the Plum Trees and said "help yourself".
 
While we were there it seemed rude not to nip into the lovely 'Planters Café ' and partake of a shared sandwich along with a jam and cream scone accompanied by a cup of coffee for me and a long cold drink for LH ... well you have to don't you :-)

 
Wearily picking up his spade for the last time once we got back home the Plum tree was soon in  the already dug hole and joined it's friends in the field and the job was done.
 
 
The first page of my nice new Planting Book filled in.
 
At the top there will be three Damson trees, they are currently on order and should be delivered towards the end of this week ..... oh well, maybe he wasn't picking up his spade for the last time after all then  ;-)
 
 
A good days work.
 
Sue xx

21 comments:

  1. It is difficult to tell from your picture, but do the trees have a 'tube' protection on their trucks to stop them being eaten by deer's and rabbits? Can't beat fruit trees and it must be lovely to be able to plant your own orchard.

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    1. Yes they do, and are attached to their posts with lengths of rubber, loose enough for growing and moving in the wind but enough to keep them firmly anchored to the hillside.

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  2. So excited for you. It's such a joy to see how you are progressing. Hopefully the mister and I will be in our forever home in a couple of years and we will defo be planting a little fruit orchard.

    Love

    jean x

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  3. Really wishing you and your lovely hubby the best in your new home, I am enjoying coming by and reading of your progress and the things you are doing to make it your own! I am inspired and hope to get chickens for my new home - next year I think (the previous owner had chickens), so I will be following your chicken posts closely.

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  4. I don't want to worry you but I bet you have put them too close together - we always do!
    Once the branches grow it gets difficult for the ride on mower to get between which causes much moaning here.
    ( Unless they are on a very small rootstock in which case ignore all the above!)

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    1. They ARE on small rootstock and are actually planted quite far apart.

      There is a three metre space between the two rows of trees and over two metres between each tree. They do look closer on the pictures but it is a large paddock so it's hard to get the perspective from a photo.

      We wanted them reasonably close as they are forming an avenue of trees between the productive growing space and what is hopefully to be our holiday home field. There is room for a ride on lawnmower to pass between them, although as that will be a relatively narrow band of grass we may simply use our petrol mower.

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  5. How exciting ! Planting for the future.
    Gill

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  6. Well done this time last year we did exactly the same , Still want to add damsons and gages but will have to go over the fence as we have filled the spot . Your nursery sounds fab we have 3 garden centres within short drive but they only cater for day tripping,lunching out, clothes, household and bedding plant buyers. can't wait to see the fruit being put to good use in later years

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  7. It is wonderful to see people planting trees. It will be beautiful in a few years hence.
    I planted a small orchard last year, and already I can see the difference.

    Lovely post.......well done.

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  8. This is a lovely post - and spooky, as I have been pondering about planting some new fruit trees to replace a couple that we lost in the bad weather this winter (including my wee baby Victoria -Sob!). Just a wee thought tho - Doyenne du Comice normally needs a pollinator in the same flowering group, Pear Concorde is often recommended for this purpose. Unless you've already got a suitable pollinator tree nearby? It would be a real shame to have those 3 gorgeous trees but a poor fruit set xxx

    I sympathise with the aches and pains after all your hard work - we spent this weekend post ramming and trenching in rabbit-proof fencing around the fruit and veg patch...suffering a bit now in the neck and shoulders!

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    1. Thanks for the pointer I'll have another read of the label.. I was sure we had chosen all self-pollinators but it's worth a double check .... would you like to tell LH that he might have to dig another hole or should I ;-)

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    2. Hmmm...I think I'd rather let you do that - he's a big chap isn't he!!!

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    3. Haha .... he's a big teddy bear .... but I think a slightly annoyed teddy bear wielding a spade should still be avoided ;-)

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  9. Lovely work - looking forward to seeing photos of that space on into the future to see the changes really taking shape!

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  10. I think you deserved that stop off for refreshments !

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  11. Good start on the orchard. As you know I'm a little tree obsessed so I'm going to think its a good thing!

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  12. Oooh lovely! Just the types of fruit trees I would plum(p) for too! Have a Bramley and a Braeburn apples in the garden, plus an unamed variety from Lidl, it just said 'Malus Domesticus' on the label! Although the picture looks like a red apple of some kind.

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  13. How wonderful, planting your own orchard; it will be lovely watching the progress over the next few years. Well done both of you, although I think I can feel your backache down here in Dorset!!

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  14. You'll have a lovely orchard.. great to see.. look forward to watching it's progress :o)

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  15. I am so envious of your space and future crop (but not at my age the work) I think you both well deserved your little treat.

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