Friday, 25 May 2012

Nature claims back.....


Nature claims back what was her own ... and it doesn't take her long to do it.



We went back to Jointers Farm today towing our large trailer, to pick up the last load of our homemade compost, what we found when we got there was proof of the statement above.  The gravel car parking area at the front was more weed than gravel.



Our always mown grass at the side of the house, came over the top of my wellies.




The Paddock where the pigs used to roam and play.....




... was overgrown and abandoned.



The Kitchen Garden that kept us fed for most of the three years we were there ....



....was a desolate place, with weeds forcing up the poythene, recycled from the polytunnel that we had left to warm the soil, hoping that a new tenant would continue our good work.




In the Orchard, where the adolescent piglets played chase around the strawbales ...




... only weeds swaying in the breeze broke the silence.  I wanted to go in to photograph the old pig pens, but the nettles were to high and my path completely blocked.




Chicken World always so alive with the sound of the girls (and their men) going about their daily business...



..is now thigh high with grass, tall weeds surround the old apple tree and the raised beds that should be at the front of this shot are completely hidden from view and full of weeds.

Nature is truly wonderful at claiming back her own ....




... and as we drove for the final time down the 2 mile long track to reach the village, we knew that we were going back to our new home.  Where we are claiming tenancy and nature will be kept in check

..... just for a little while!

Sue xx

10 comments:

  1. Was it bittersweet going back Sue?

    Or full of lovely memories?

    Are the new tenants in yet?

    Sft x

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  2. Sft - Bittersweet in some ways and full of memories, some good, some bad, but all shared and it taught us so much.

    No new tenants yet, the longer it is left to revert to nature the harder they will struggle to find the right tenants. It's an expensive house to rent and the land is only suitable for some things. Luckily it suited us and our 'Living in the Country' experiment. But it's not for everyone.

    We made the right decision leaving though, now we can save for our future. But wherever we live together will always be home!

    Sue xx
    Our New Life in the Country

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  3. Man thinks we are so superior. Once we are all gone, I think nature will erase most of what we did....like we never existed.
    Jane x

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  4. I believe it is good therapy to return to a place you have experienced life ... even better to return to the happy place you now call home. I enjoyed your post today, Sue.

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  5. So true - nature wills out, always. Kind of sad to go back, and see the place you cared so well for left uncared for. Hopefully someone will love it again, and you now have your new home.

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  6. Heartbreaking for you to see everything neglected - I do hope the new tenants will enjoy the challenge and get it back in shape - it is amazing how quickly nature does take over - when I had my allotment, it only had to rain for a day and two days later I would be forcing the weeds back that appear from nowhere!

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  7. last week I took a detour through Bournemouth to look at the house we lived in when we were children...it was a huge Edwardian mansion in a leafy suburb and mum and dad rented the ground floor.

    Mum took in a lodger to help with the rent but the lady turned out to be a "distressed gentlewoman" with no money and so my mum being as soft as butter, had her live with us for free.

    Her name was Miss St.Aubin and she was far too grand to do any cleaning or household chores in return for a room the size of a modern house, so she gave us elocution lessons instead!

    Anyhow, the house had been turned into student flats, didn't look anywhere near as large as I remembered, the orchard was a housing estate and the leafy suburb a seedy and rundown neighbourhood.

    Oh well!
    xx

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  8. The differences are amazing. I think I would have cried seeing it in that state. Mother nature always wins in the end. Hope you enjoy your new home.

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  9. How scary is that? There was a TV programme a few years ago showing what earth would be like if there were no longer any humans on it, how fast the vegetation would grow through buildings etc.

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  10. We've been away for a week and came back to find calf-high grass and weeds on the paths between beds on our allotment patch...amazing how they seem to grow SO much faster than the veggies! Having said that, my blackcurrant bush is absolutely loaded with fruits and they have doubled in size during our week away.

    It always surprises me how very quickly buildings get such a run-down shabby look when they're left empty, with plants growing up to hide the walls and even plants on the roof. Mother Nature is so strong!

    Regards, Sooze xx

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